Significant decisions: a comparison of the road not taken and the choice essay

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; 5 Then took the other, as just as fair And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that, the passing there Had worn them really about the same, 10 And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black.

Significant decisions: a comparison of the road not taken and the choice essay

Ever since infancy I have had the habit of leaving my blocks carts chairs and such like ordinaries where people would be pretty sure to fall forward over them in the dark.

Forward, you understand, and in the dark. In the spring ofRobert Frost sent an envelope to English critic Edward Thomas that contained only one item: It staggered me to think that perhaps I had always missed what made poetry poetry.

A tap would have settled my poem. I wonder if it was because you were trying too much out of regard for me that you failed to see that the sigh [in line 16] was a mock sigh, hypo-critical for the fun of the thing.

Significant decisions: a comparison of the road not taken and the choice essay

There is no evidence that Frost ever contemplated doing so, in agony or otherwise. The more one thinks about it, the more difficult it becomes to be sure who is doing what and why. As the scholar Mark Richardson puts it: Or does the title refer to the supposedly better-travelled road that the speaker himself fails to take?

Precisely who is not doing the taking? Frost wanted readers to ask the questions Richardson asks. More than that, he wanted to juxtapose two visions—two possible poems, you might say—at the very beginning of his lyric. The second is the parodic poem that Frost himself claimed to have originally had in mind, in which the dominant tone is one of self-dramatizing regret for a path not taken by the speaker.

These two potential poems revolve around each other, separating and overlapping like clouds in a way that leaves neither reading perfectly visible. But if you think of the poem not as stating various viewpoints but rather as performing them, setting them beside and against one another, then a very different reading emerges.

Two distinct objects may, by being dexterously presented, again and again in quick succession, to the mind of a cursory reader, be so associated together in his thoughts, as to be conceived capable…of being actually combined in practice.

What is fallacious in an argument can be mesmerizing in a poem. The title itself is a small but potent engine that drives us first toward one untaken road and then immediately back to the other, producing a vision in which we appear somehow on both roads, or neither.

At a Glance

This is true even of its first line. Yet, as the scholar George Monteiro observes: First, a road, unlike a path, is necessarily man-made. The act of choosing may be solitary, but the context in which it occurs is not.

In this case, we have what seems like the most straightforward preposition imaginable:'The Road Not Taken' is one of the most famous poems written by the American poet, Robert Frost. The poem describes a person standing at a fork in the road in a wood, unsure which one to take.

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost introduces a theme of making life decisions, while using symbolism and tone as tools to show his readers that the right choice is not always the easy one. Frost’s main theme was to show his show more content. Decisions in Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken Essay - Decisions in Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken Throughout our lives we are faced with a number of important decisions, decisions that determine an unseen future. - The Power of Choice Revealed in The Road Not Taken Frost's flare for using nature to and man's . Sophia Hill English November 30, Mrs. Spivey Poem Essay “A Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost I. Theme and mood A. Frost uses the two paths symbolically as a choice to be made between decisions having to be made. B. The sigh in the end of the poem, portrays a sign of regret, or realization of making the wrong choice. II. 97%(71).

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost introduces a theme of making life decisions, while using symbolism and tone as tools to show his readers that the right choice is not always the easy one. Frost’s main theme was to show his show more content.

George Montiero "THE ROAD NOT TAKEN" can be read against a literary and pictorial tradition that might be called "The Choice of the Two Paths, " reaching not only back to the Gospels and beyond them to the Greeks but to ancient English verse as well.

A Road Not Taken” and “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening comparison Essay. A+. The both reflect on the human nature of questioning one’s self and one’s decisions in life.

In “A Road Not Taken” it seems as if the speaker is upset that they had not taken a different path in life so he decides to “take the one less travel. Robert Frost’s The Road Not Taken Analysis The poem seems to make a reader think about the decisions they make in life and the cause-n-effect behind their decisions.

Initially the poem seems to have a motivational tone to it, but after reading and thinking on it, it magnifies the fear most people have when it is time to make a decision; afraid of . And the road not taken, of course, is the road one didn’t take—which means that the title passes over the “less traveled” road the speaker claims to have followed in order to foreground the road he never tried.

On "The Road Not Taken"